Copernicus New Cond

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MORNING BELL
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AN ARM AND A LEG
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TRADITIONNELLEMENT
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ISABELLA, OR THE POT OF BASIL
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LET NOT THE SUN GO DOWN ON YOUR WRATH
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YOU CAN’T MAKE A TOMLETTE WITHOUT BREAKING A FEW GREGS
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A star is an astronomical object comprising a luminous spheroid of plasma held together by self-gravity. The nearest star to Earth is the Sun. Many other stars are visible to the naked eye at night; their immense distances from Earth make them appear as fixed points of light. The most prominent stars have been categorised into constellations and asterisms, and many of the brightest stars have proper names.
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A star’s life begins with the gravitational collapse of a gaseous nebula of material largely comprising hydrogen, helium, and trace heavier elements. Its total mass mainly determines its evolution and eventual fate. A star shines for most of its active life due to the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium in its core. Stellar nucleosynthesis in stars or their remnants creates almost all naturally occurring chemical elements heavier than lithium.
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Astronomers can determine stellar properties—including mass, age, metallicity (chemical composition), variability, distance, and motion through space—by carrying out observations of a star’s apparent brightness, spectrum, and changes in its position in the sky over time. Stars can form orbital systems with other astronomical objects, as in planetary systems and star systems with two or more stars.
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Early astronomers recognized a difference between fixed stars, whose position on the celestial sphere does not change, and wandering stars (planets) which move noticeably relative to the fixed stars over days or weeks. Many ancient astronomers believed that the stars were permanently affixed to a heavenly sphere and that they were immutable. By convention, astronomers grouped prominent stars into asterisms and constellations.
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The concept of a constellation was known to exist during the Babylonian period. Ancient sky watchers imagined that prominent arrangements of stars formed patterns, and they associated these with particular aspects of nature or their myths. Twelve of these formations lay along the band of the ecliptic and these became the basis of astrology. Many of the more prominent individual stars were given names, particularly with Arabic or Latin designations.
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Many stars are observed, and most or all may have originally formed in gravitationally bound, multiple-star systems. This is particularly true for very massive O and B class stars, 80% of which are believed to be part of multiple-star systems. The proportion of single star systems increases with decreasing star mass, so that only 25% of red dwarfs are known to have stellar companions.

About Copernicus New Cond

Tight beta 2024.01.29. The present beta represents the expected weight range and is kerned and tightly spaced. The default numeral set lining proportional, with lining tabular and oldstyle proportional also included. In the previous beta, the heaviest weight was much wider, being more of a semicondensed. As a result, all weights are now uniformly condensed. Galaxie New Condensed will be released before the end of 2024.Q1. Licensees of the Beta will receive the final files when they are released.

Supported Languages

Afrikaans, Albanian, Basque, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Irish Gaelic, Italian, Kurdish, Latin, Latvian, Leonese, Lithuanian, Lower Sorbian, Luxembourgish, Malay, Maltese, Manx, Māori, Norwegian, Occitan, Polish, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Romanian, Sami, Scots, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Turkish, Upper Sorbian, Walloon, Welsh

PDF Specimen

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